The Pavilion for Women at Texas Children's Hospital
  • The Women's Place

    Dedicated to women's reproductive health

    For many women, the hormonal changes that take place during the reproductive years can trigger emotional symptoms as well as physical. If you find yourself suffering from mood or psychiatric conditions related to your reproductive cycle – from severe premenstrual symptoms (PMDD) to postpartum mood or anxiety disorders to emotional difficulties during menopause – we can help. The Women’s Place is one of only a handful of programs in the United States dedicated to the care and treatment of women’s reproductive mental health. We work closely with other specialists throughout Baylor College of Medicine to better understand and improve women’s mental health issues related to the reproductive cycle – and the impact on their children and families. With our combined expertise in psychiatry and OB/GYN, we understand what you are going through and offer the specialized, expert care you need.

    Call us for an appointment: 832-826-5281

    Our services

    We offer psychiatric consultation and treatment plans to help you and your family deal with disorders at any phase of the reproductive cycle. Women come to us for evaluation and help with:

    Premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD)

    A severe form of PMS.

    Pre-pregnancy planning

    Evaluation of a women’s mental health and medications prior to conception and development of a plan to prevent or manage the onset or recurrence of psychiatric condition. Women who had postpartum depression after a prior pregnancy have up to an 80% chance of recurrence.

    Infertility issues

    Mood and anxiety disorders associated with infertility diagnoses and treatments.

    Fetal Center and genetic counseling

    Helping mothers cope after diagnosis of a fetal genetic disorder. 

    Prenatal care

    Mood and anxiety disorders that occur during pregnancy. 

    Psychiatric medication management

    Helping help women and their primary physicians determine the best choice regarding psychiatric medicine during pregnancy and breastfeeding, based on the latest scientific information on the effects of these medications.

    Postpartum care

    Mood and anxiety disorders after pregnancy, including postpartum depression, are the No. 1 complications after delivery, more than infection and hemorrhage.

    Assistance during reproductive loss and grief

    Including stillbirths, miscarriage or the death of a child during the first year.

    Perimenopause and menopause

    Mood and anxiety disorders leading up to and after menopause. 

    Normal 'baby blues' or postpartum depression?

    Giving birth is an emotional experience that can leave you feeling down, overwhelmed and exhausted. Studies show that about 80 percent of all new mothers get “the blues” soon after giving birth.

    However, if you’re feeling more than just the blues and feelings of depression last more than two weeks, tell family members and ask for help. Research has revealed that 10% to 20% of new mothers experience more serious postpartum symptoms. 

    Use the Edinburgh Postpartum Depression Screening Tool

    If you are worried you are going to hurt your baby and need immediate help, put your baby down in a safe place, walk out of the room and call your physician, a family member or friend.

    Getting help

    Taking care of your baby means taking care of yourself. While it may be hard with a newborn, getting enough sleep, eating right and exercising regularly can have a positive impact on your mental health. Know that help is always available if you need it. If you find yourself feeling depressed or overwhelmed by your new role as a mother and it’s interfering with your ability to care for your baby, talk to your physician about a treatment that’s right for you. 

    For parenting advice on a variety of issues, call our experts at the Texas Children’s Parent Advice Line: 832-824-1777.

    For urgent needs, call the Hope Line at 1-800-PPD-MOMS (1-800-773-6667), a free, confidential resource for postpartum depression, or check out the website for Postpartum Support International (PSI) for information and help in your area.